Sunday, January 13, 2013

Dark Waxing Made Easy

When I found the blog Stiltskin Studios and their post on ASCP wax I jumped on that posting because I was having some issues with AS waxes.  I already bought Minwax finishing paste to use instead of the clear wax.  But I still had to use the AS clear wax if I wanted to use the dark.  Their posting gave information on mixing the AS dark wax with mineral spirits to make it more of a glaze.

First I painted a plate rack with two coats of my homemade chalk paint in Behr Outback. Once it was dry I sanded it smooth and distressed it slightly. Then I made the dark wax "glaze".  You will need the mineral spirits (I wound up buying paint thinner because it was a little cheaper and they both have the same basic ingredients), AS Dark Wax, a small container, something to scoop/mix with and rubber gloves.
I mixed approximately half dark wax (about a tablespoon) to half paint thinner.  **If you have leftover it will solidify, just add more paint thinner and it will soften up to be used again.**
It takes a few minutes of mixing, but you'll want it to be a hot fudge type consistency.  
I used a scrap piece of drop cloth to dip in the wax and WIPED IT DIRECTLY ON THE PAINT!  I did not use the clear wax first!  I know the wax police says not to apply the dark wax directly on the paint as you can ruin your paint color or will not have the opportunity to "fix it" with the clear wax.  But since the wax's consistency has been changed by the paint thinner, you have time to wipe it off if you put too much.  And you want it to change the color of the paint--otherwise you wouldn't be using it in the first place.

Here is a before of what the paint color looks like without the dark wax glaze on it.  It's very light and one dimensional.

This is that same green color with the dark wax glaze:
I applied the dark wax glaze all over and wiped it off with the same piece of drop cloth by turning the cloth over to a dry spot.  It really is like using glaze--you'll want to wipe it off so it is not too wet, just leave the hint of the color.  I think it looks very consistent and not blotchy at all. 
It brings out all the marks in the wood and adds so much depth to the piece.  It darkens the color to give it a worn look to go with the distressing.

It also saves the step in the process by not having to apply the clear wax first.  I waxed this piece just with the dark wax "glaze".  Once it was cured (no longer sticky to the touch), I buffed it with a clean piece of drop cloth and it is smooth as can be.
This is one of my new favorite techniques and I cannot sing its praises enough!  You should definitely give it a try, I think you will love the results.

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26 comments:

  1. I like it! Especially considering it is a lot easier than distressing. Nice job!

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  2. Wow!! Love this idea!! Will definitley be trying it!

    Jenna @ rainonatinroof.com

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  3. That looks awesome!! Thanks for sharing. I will definitely give this a try.

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  4. Cool!! I will give it a try!!
    Thanks,
    Denise

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  5. I am all for saving steps when redoing a project. Thanks for the info! I actually have a quart of that same paint and love the color. Your plate rack looks nice with that color and your distressing technique. Shannon

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  6. Oh, great! Thanks for this. I'm pinning and will give it a try on a little chest I want to paint next. Found you via Get Your Craft On!

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  7. Oh, I love it! It turned out beautifully! Thanks for the great info, too! Thank you so much for sharing at A Bouquet of Talent. I hope you are having a wonderful week. :)

    Kathy

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  8. Hey Susan! Just FYI I will also apply the dark wax directly to the piece I'm working on and then use a cloth or 0000 steel wool with low odor mineral spirits and wipe the dark wax down to achieve the glazed look... You might want to try that way too... I loved this tutorial though!

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  9. Your plate rack turned out great!!! Thanks for the tutorial.
    Candy
    PICKINandPAITNIN.blogspot.com

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  10. I have trouble with AS Dark Wax too. This could be my life saver...or furniture saver! Thanks

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  11. Thanks for this tutorial. I have not tried AS wax yet,but good to know for when I do use it.
    Donna

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  12. Looks wonderful!

    Thank you for partying with the Wildly Original Crowd.
    <3 Christina at I Gotta Create!

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  13. Very good to know, thanks for sharing, visiting from The Shabby Nest!

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  14. I love the look of the finished piece!
    Thanks for stopping by my blog!

    Jo

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  15. Susan, Another bloggers helped me through the some rough "issues" with using ASCP dark wax. I was putting it on too thick and then waiting 24 hours to buff. In humid MI it was taking weeks to dry and cure. This blogger said to wipe it down with a clean dry cloth immediately after waxing. Frugal me thought it was wasteful, but gave it a go. IT WORKED! This is my standard process now. I do recommend it.

    Small House / Big Sky Donna
    White Oak Studio Designs
    http://smallhouseunderabigsky.wordpress.com
    Facebook: donnaallgaierlamberti@facebook.com

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  16. Hi,
    You have some great ideas and we would like for you to share with our readers too. We are hosting our first link party tomorrow and we would like to invite you to link up with us. We have a fun blog to co-host with us. Hope to see you there.

    Thanks!
    The Busy Bee's,
    Myrna and Joye.

    http://thebusybhive.blogspot.com/

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  17. Such a fabulous tip! My arms get tired from doing a large piece with the dark wax and a brush, and I LOVE that this allows you not to use the clear wax first. You mention that you have to use AS clear wax before the AS dark wax. I use Minwax clear, then AS dark - haven't ever tried the AS clear. What is the difference in application?

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  18. Wow!! I like it! Thanks for sharing.

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  19. Thanks for providing the information about Dark Waxing. Really nice blog!

    Waxing San Ramon

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  20. I am just too happy to have found this idea since I could never seem to master the "clear first, then dark" wax technique! Looking forward to trying this out soon! Blessings!

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  21. Great tutorial, thank you! since seeing this a few months back it in now my favorite method as well. I love the vintage look of it, looks great on a turquoise as well, darkens and deepens it. I have done a few coffee and side tables but my concern is how it will hold up, do you think I could get away with a light poly or varathane coat or spray? I guess another method I could do to get the same look would be to use a dark paint mixed with paint thinner then wipe off and do a poly? but I like the wax look.....

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    Replies
    1. couldn't figure out how to put my comment in with a email so entered as anonymous, could you reply to foxycoxy80@hotmail.com
      Thank you so much!
      Amber

      Delete
  22. So excited to have found this on Pinterest...reading up on "How To's" to find easiest, cheapest yet greatest results for an upcoming workshop I want to hold. This looks great and I already had purchased some poly so will probably finish with that step for a durable lasting finish...Love this...Thanks...Pinning!

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